Mark Locicero1

Honorary Research Member
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Education

B.A.Hon., Queen's University (Classical Studies)
M.A., University of British Columbia (Greek and Roman Archaeology)
Ph.D., Leiden University (Roman Archaeology)


About

Career

In addition to my research, I have worked on archaeological excavations and survey projects in central Italy, Sicily, Jordan, Serbia, and Bulgaria. Teaching is an important part of my investigation of the ancient Mediterranean world, and has led me to teach courses at Leiden University (The Netherlands), Augsburg University (Germany), and UBC. I am always looking for opportunities to further develop my pedagogical skills and make the exploration of the ancient Mediterranean world more accessible.


Teaching


Research

Research Interests

  • Archaeology of Roman Urbanism
  • Ancient Water and Sewer Systems
  • Sustainable Resource Usage in the past and present
  • Archaeology of Roman North Africa
  • Interaction between text, material culture, and environmental practices

Projects

I am interested in the interaction between ancient Mediterranean cultures and their natural environments, specifically by investigating the acquisition, usage, and disposal of water in the Roman world. To do this, I apply methods currently used to assess the sustainability of modern cities to ancient data sets. This allows me to draw out new relationships between ancient cultures and their local environments, diverse technological traditions, and a wide range of culturally circumscribed approaches to water.

My current research project examines the role of water in Roman North Africa by investigating the Roman city of Volubilis, located in modern Morocco. This city has a long history of interacting with water, ranging from the Hellenistic to the Early Islamic period. By carrying out a detailed analysis of the city’s water supply and drainage systems, and by placing these in context with wider environmental and social forces, this project aims to create a more holistic understanding of local approaches to water usage. This involves examining the reception/rejection of more widespread hydraulic technologies, and hopes to highlight not just how, but why the inhabitants of Volubilis used water as they did.


Mark Locicero1

Honorary Research Member
launchAcademia
Education

B.A.Hon., Queen's University (Classical Studies)
M.A., University of British Columbia (Greek and Roman Archaeology)
Ph.D., Leiden University (Roman Archaeology)


About

Career

In addition to my research, I have worked on archaeological excavations and survey projects in central Italy, Sicily, Jordan, Serbia, and Bulgaria. Teaching is an important part of my investigation of the ancient Mediterranean world, and has led me to teach courses at Leiden University (The Netherlands), Augsburg University (Germany), and UBC. I am always looking for opportunities to further develop my pedagogical skills and make the exploration of the ancient Mediterranean world more accessible.


Teaching


Research

Research Interests

  • Archaeology of Roman Urbanism
  • Ancient Water and Sewer Systems
  • Sustainable Resource Usage in the past and present
  • Archaeology of Roman North Africa
  • Interaction between text, material culture, and environmental practices

Projects

I am interested in the interaction between ancient Mediterranean cultures and their natural environments, specifically by investigating the acquisition, usage, and disposal of water in the Roman world. To do this, I apply methods currently used to assess the sustainability of modern cities to ancient data sets. This allows me to draw out new relationships between ancient cultures and their local environments, diverse technological traditions, and a wide range of culturally circumscribed approaches to water.

My current research project examines the role of water in Roman North Africa by investigating the Roman city of Volubilis, located in modern Morocco. This city has a long history of interacting with water, ranging from the Hellenistic to the Early Islamic period. By carrying out a detailed analysis of the city’s water supply and drainage systems, and by placing these in context with wider environmental and social forces, this project aims to create a more holistic understanding of local approaches to water usage. This involves examining the reception/rejection of more widespread hydraulic technologies, and hopes to highlight not just how, but why the inhabitants of Volubilis used water as they did.


Mark Locicero1

Honorary Research Member
launchAcademia
Education

B.A.Hon., Queen's University (Classical Studies)
M.A., University of British Columbia (Greek and Roman Archaeology)
Ph.D., Leiden University (Roman Archaeology)

About keyboard_arrow_down

Career

In addition to my research, I have worked on archaeological excavations and survey projects in central Italy, Sicily, Jordan, Serbia, and Bulgaria. Teaching is an important part of my investigation of the ancient Mediterranean world, and has led me to teach courses at Leiden University (The Netherlands), Augsburg University (Germany), and UBC. I am always looking for opportunities to further develop my pedagogical skills and make the exploration of the ancient Mediterranean world more accessible.

Teaching keyboard_arrow_down
Research keyboard_arrow_down

Research Interests

  • Archaeology of Roman Urbanism
  • Ancient Water and Sewer Systems
  • Sustainable Resource Usage in the past and present
  • Archaeology of Roman North Africa
  • Interaction between text, material culture, and environmental practices

Projects

I am interested in the interaction between ancient Mediterranean cultures and their natural environments, specifically by investigating the acquisition, usage, and disposal of water in the Roman world. To do this, I apply methods currently used to assess the sustainability of modern cities to ancient data sets. This allows me to draw out new relationships between ancient cultures and their local environments, diverse technological traditions, and a wide range of culturally circumscribed approaches to water.

My current research project examines the role of water in Roman North Africa by investigating the Roman city of Volubilis, located in modern Morocco. This city has a long history of interacting with water, ranging from the Hellenistic to the Early Islamic period. By carrying out a detailed analysis of the city’s water supply and drainage systems, and by placing these in context with wider environmental and social forces, this project aims to create a more holistic understanding of local approaches to water usage. This involves examining the reception/rejection of more widespread hydraulic technologies, and hopes to highlight not just how, but why the inhabitants of Volubilis used water as they did.